Abstracts 2/2019

It’s time to work together

Tapio Varmola, President, Seinäjoki University of Applied Sciences, Chairman, The Rectors Conference of Universities of Applied Sciences (ARENE)

Digitalisation is bringing many changes to the way that higher education institutions operate. It impacts both research and innovation activities, and raises the need for many changes in both teaching and support services.

In the UK, a dream was born in the 1970s to build an Open University. Thanks to technological developments, the principal idea behind this – higher education teaching that is independent of time and place – can now be made a reality. Many higher education institutions in Finland are now pondering this idea as they work on reshaping their strategies.

Finland has 23 universities of applied sciences and 13 universities. By bringing together the strengths and expertise of all of these, Finland could become a model country for flexible study, a forerunner in modern higher education studies.

This requires new kinds of cooperation between higher education institutions, to which their boards, teachers, and key data management personnel and partners must be committed. Here are a few examples:

Student mobility and cooperation in higher education require compatible processes and perhaps also shared platforms. New digital operating models are needed in study administration in order to promote student mobility. Higher education collaboration in online teaching and pedagogical development should be encouraged in every way possible, and teachers should be rewarded for it. There is also a need to study the effectiveness of digital teaching.

In Finland there are many national data resources for teaching which should be put to use and further developed for the benefit of students. This could also generate a unique competitive advantage at the international level.

The current state of affairs is a fragmented one: we currently have in use around 150 different teaching and study administration data systems and applications. Through long-term collaboration, we can at least get from fragments to building blocks, and then gradually put these blocks together.

New expectations are being placed on higher education institutions in the area of continuing education. This creates both challenges and opportunities for teaching. The competencies of adults in the workplace are at varying levels, but at least some of them are already acting in a digital, global operating environment. How do we respond to this demand?

Higher education institutions have had a wide variety of experiences with national collaboration projects relating to teaching or study administration. They do not always leave people hungry for more. But let’s not indulge those that gripe about the past. We must shape for the coming decade a new digital vision for joint learning, implement it ambitiously, and value the experiences of working together which we already have.

 

AAPA and FUCIO: Collaboration of universities in digitalization for decades

Jaakko Riihimaa, IT General Secretary, AAPA (Human network of CIOs in Universities of Applied Science), jaakko.riihimaa(at)haaga-helia.fi
Teemu Seesto, IT General Secretary, FUCIO (Human network of CIOs in Universities), teemu.seesto(at)utu.fi

In Finland both universities and UASes (Universities of Applied Sciences) have a human network of CIOs (chief information officers). Although all universities compete with each other, these networks cooperate closely with each other and share knowledge. In both networks there is a ”stooge”, an IT General Secretary working full time. Common expert groups in the fields such as cyber security, privacy issues, enterprise architecture, contract management as well as identity management, work efficiently within that framework. A wide variety of data is also collected and the results are shared annually.

Key words: CIO (chief information officer), knowledge sharing, co-operative networks, digitalization

 

The new role of IT in digitalization

Anssi Hietaharju, M.Sc. (Admin.), Advisor, Sofigate Oy, anssi.hietaharju(at)sofigate.com
Mari Nyrhinen, D.Ed., ICT Manager, Diaconia University of Applied Sciences, mari.nyrhinen(at)diak.fi

Digitalization has created a wave of change in many industries. Organizations now invest increasingly on digitalization in pursuit of innovations, increased effectiveness and modern customer experiences.

As new information technologies infiltrate to a variety of activities the organization is engaged with, it generates a risk that digital development becomes fragmented and every digital service composes an independent entity. Therefore, it is crucial that the IT functions and core functions in the organization work in close cooperation to ensure that the services in the organization produce the highest possible added value for both its internal and external customers.

This article presents the mindset of the Business Technology standard (BT standard) that was published by the Business Technology Forum in January 2019. BT standard offers a strategy, including a set of best practices, tools and structures, for organizing and coordinating technology management as whole across the entire organization. Moreover, this article shows how technologies in BT standard have been categorized in different technology areas.

In addition to the point of views of the BT standard, the article provides some tips on how to get started in building a BT mindset in your own organization.

Key words: Business Technology standard, digitalization, information technologies

 

Framework for Digitally-Competent Educational Organisations: DigCompOrg

Kari Helenius, M.Sc. (Tech.), CIO, Häme University of Applied Sciences, kari.helenius(at)hamk.fi
Lotta Linko, M.A., Quality Manager, Häme University of Applied Sciences, lotta.linko(at)hamk.fi
Henna Pirttilä, M.A., Development Manager, Häme University of Applied Sciences, henna.pirttila(at)hamk.fi

New technologies are changing education at organisational and pedagogical level. New digital competencies are required from students, staff and support functions. This article discusses how DigCompOrg (Kampylis, Punie & Devine 2015) has been utilised at three different levels at HAMK: to promote strategic development, structure enterprise architecture and organise team work.
DigCompOrg is a European framework for the digital competence of an educational organisation. It covers leadership and governance, teaching and learning, professional development, assessment, content and curricula, collaboration and networking, and infrastructure.

At strategic level DigCompOrg provides a frame for developing the core competences of HAMK’s (Häme University of Applied Sciences) ICT: facilitating digitalisation, information management and automation, data-driven decision-making and agile service development. Embedded in enterprise architecture, DigCompOrg reveals the interdependencies between development projects that affect skills, processes, data, information systems, technologies and digital infrastructure. HAMK’s learning development team have structured their operational roadmap, action plan, targets and tasks in accordance with DigCompOrg.

A shared framework ensures parallel activity at strategic, tactic and operational level.

Key words: digital competencies, enterprise architecture, action plan, digitalization, development

 

A common path towards the future – The Lapland University Consortium’s shared CIO Office and ICT Services

Manu Pajuluoma, M.A., CIO, University of Lapland & Lapland University of Applied Sciences, Manu.Pajuluoma(at)ulapland.fi
Markku Taipale, M.A., CIO, University of Lapland & Lapland University of Applied Sciences, Markku.Taipale(at)lapinamk.fi

Lapland has over ten years of successful contract-based cooperation in providing ICT services for higher education institutions.

The introduction of the Lapland University Consortium’s shared CIO Office and ICT Services at the beginning of 2019 marks the next major step forward in the consortium’s strategic development efforts. In connection with the reorganization, sixteen employees of the Lapland UAS made a transition to the new Group CIO Office and ICT Services organization operating at the University of Lapland.

The organizational change process was co-designed with the employees involved in the change. During the initial stages of the development work, descriptions of the current state of the operations were produced and the vision of the Group CIO Office and ICT Services was outlined. The results of audits and evaluations carried out in our work community were utilized in the process. Based on the initial investigations, working groups of experts were set to develop the organizational structure and to define the core tasks, roles and responsibilities.

The activities of the Group CIO Office and ICT Services of the Universities are based on shared policies and services. Development is guided by a common enterprise architecture, common information security policies and a shared customer care model.

Key words: Information management, ICT Services, change management, collaboration, joint planning, University Consortium

Karelia is led by information

Mikko Penttinen, Quality Coordinator, Karelia University of Applied Sciences, mikko.penttinen(at)karelia.fi
Lauri Hänninen, ICT-planning Officer, Karelia University of Applied Sciences, lauri.hanninen(at)karelia.fi

Changes in the higher education funding model and the reductions of funding have resulted in the need for systematic monitoring and anticipation of higher education operations and economy. A large amount of real-time data is available in many different systems and the challenge has been the management of this amount of data and the use of the information as a support for the management in decision-making. Based on this need, Karelia University of Applied Sciences started to develop a knowledge management tool, Karelia-Vipunen. The success of the development work was based on cooperation between IT and other units at the higher education institution. This article describes the development history of Karelia-Vipunen as well as the use of its data in the monitoring of operations and economy.

Key words: Karelia University of Applied Sciences, knowledge management, data administration, Karelia-Vipunen, cooperation

IT benchmarking for better knowledge management

Tuomo Rintamäki, M.Pol.Sc., M.Sc. (Econ.), CIO, Metropolia University of Applied Sciences, tuomo.rintamaki(at)metropolia.fi
Juha Venho, M. Eng., CIO, Turku University of Applied Sciences, juha.venho(at)turkuamk.fi
Teemu Seesto, IT General Secretary, FUCIO (Human network of CIOs in Universities), teemu.seesto(at)utu.fi

How digitalization in universities of applied sciences (UAS) correlates with their spending on IT resources?
How much are we spending on IT? How does our spending on IT compare with other UASs?
If we know the structure of our IT costs can we improve the impact of IT on core functions?

Most Finnish UAS are participating in BenchHEIT survey (BM) with the aim to find answers to these questions and to be able to provide recommendations to UAS management to improve the impact of IT resources.

BM is a survey on IT costs and volumes of higher education institutes. Its participation is voluntary and free of charge. The survey has been invented and is being developed and managed as a EUNIS Task Force.

From the BM analysis we can find out that IT costs in relation to student FTE have decreased about 7% during the last five years. During 2013–2017 the share of IT expenditure out of total expenditures of the Finnish UASes has remained fairly stable, about 6.5% . According to these figures there has not been heavy inputs on digitalization. On the other hand, the space allocated to IT classrooms have decreased 38%.

In the BM analysis it is possible to pick up other universities and put them in comparison by all indicators. E.g. the top management of Turku UAS prefers to be compared with other big Finnish UASes. Regular, annual participation in BM survey makes it possible to draw time series and to find out core development trends. IT chiefs of Finnish UAS have introduced permanent process to improve the reliability of BM data and thus improve its value in comparison.

Key words: Benchmarking, IT-costs, digitalization

 

Project portfolio management enables data management

Outi Pelkonen, BBA, Planner, Turku University of Applied Sciences
Johanna Krappe, M.A., Head of Research, Development and Innovation Services, Turku University of Applied Sciences
Juha Venho, Master of Engineering, CIO, Turku University of Applied Sciences

In the year 2014, TUAS faced severe problems in project portfolio management. The portfolio and project management system did not support the processes nor the information management. TUAS decided to start a digitalization project where the project processes would be developed and a new project portfolio management system would be purchased. The aim was to enhance portfolio management, streamline the processes and decrease the number of systems and Excel files in use. After extensive internal planning and requirement phase and a short deployment phase, the TEPPO system was implemented on the 1st of June 2017. Roll-out was made progressively in line with the changes in processes and different functionalities were taken into use monthly during the first half a year. There have been over 400 monthly users, which means more emphasis needs to be given to the training and instruction. Trainings will be organized continuously for new and advanced users in order to ensure the adoption of the new system and procedures. A crucial prerequisite for success in these kind of changes is the clear support and commitment of the management board. Evaluation of the implementation shows that other critical factors are communication and engaging a wide range of the users in the planning phase. TEPPO is now a permanent part of TUAS’ continuous development cycle.

Key words: Project portfolio management, RDI-projects, Digitalization, Information systems

 

Using data – perspectives on data management in University of Applied Sciences

Seliina Päällysaho, PhD, M.Sc. (Econ.), Research Manager, Seinäjoki University of Applied Sciences, seliina.paallysaho(at)seamk.fi
Jaana Latvanen, M.Soc.Sc., Information Specialist, Seinäjoki University of Applied Sciences, jaana.latvanen(at)seamk.fi

The questions relating to the data management have arisen to a significant role in R&D work, public administration as well as in business. The collected data can be used to create new ideas but also provide the companies a good opportunity to develop their business and new products. The most common datasets in research, development and innovation projects of the universities of applied sciences are often collected by inquiries and interviews. The data management is very complex. The processes of storing and opening the data sets are still undeveloped and need to be improved.

This article represents the handling of the data which is created in the Finnish UAS (Universities of Applied Sciences) and brings out the special characteristics of the data management especially of the projects which are carried out in the company cooperation.

Key words: open R&D, open science, universities of applied sciences

 

Let’s learn in digicampus – meaning Where?

Matti Sarén, PhD, eMBA, President/CEO, Kajaani University of Applied Sciences, matti.saren(at)kamk.fi
Jaakko Riihimaa, PhD, IT General Secretary, AAPA (Human network of CIOs in Universities of Applied Science), jaakko.riihimaa(at)haaga-helia.fi
Jukka Ivonen, B.A., CIO, Haaga-Helia University of Applied Sciences, jukka.ivonen(at)haaga-helia.fi
Petri Silmälä, M.A., Coordinator, Metropolia University of Applied Sciences, petri.silmala(at)metropolia.fi
Sonja Merisalo, MScEng, UX Designer/Trimico Oy, sonja.merisalo(at)trimico.fi

Wake up to the future world, where a helpful kyborg is a housemaid and instead of mom there is an eMommy reminding you to go to the next lecture. To be precise, the lecture has changed to a global module which is held in a hologram space online. Actually, the whole concept of education has evolved: professional qualification has compartmented to a portfolio of know-how. AI takes care of the routine and technical issues. In learning, person´s self-direction is still important. Digitalization has changed the traditional educational structure: a resource-driven individual´s knowledge path is the way to learn. VR enables different kind of simulations and AR makes it easy to learn e.g. human anatomy. The best learning environment depends on the student, demands of the educational institute and features of the subject and the course. New technologies bring machine learning and AI algorithms to student guidance. Teacher is more of a “with learner” or “with supervisor” supported by technology.

Key words: learning, digital campus, virtual reality, learning environment, know-how, pedagogy, information management

 

IT management, digitalization and pedagogy

Tore Ståhl, M.Ed., Educational Researcher, Arcada University of Applied Sciences, tore.stahl(at)arcada.fi

End-users often think of IT management as distributing gadgets and maintaining network connections. The most crucial management, however, happens in the background in terms of data and user management.

Digitalization is the buzzword of this century, although it is often unclear what it includes, and what we want to achieve through digitalization. Within higher education, digitalization should be student and learning oriented.

Higher education pedagogy and learning is characterized by an increasing portion of activities on-line, which decreases or at least alters several aspects of communication, such as the lack of visual cues. Partly due to this, learning analytics has become interesting since it can provide us with cues regarding student behaviour.

Digitalization, on-line learning and learning analytics are connected by their dependence on the user identification provided by the IT management. Although IT infrastructure is a prerequisite for digitalization, it should be subordinate in relation to learning and pedagogy.

Vilken är IT-förvaltningens roll då högskolorna digitaliseras? Denna artikel är avsedd att ge den vanliga användaren en förståelse för IT-förvaltningens roll i högskolan generellt, och att presentera några reflektioner runt digitalisering, pedagogik och lärande (oppiminen). Reflektionerna härrör ur flera perspektiv, dvs. mina 10 år som ”adb-ansvarig”, 14 år som nätpedagogisk utvecklare och en 4 års sejour som IT-chef.

Key words: information management, user management, learning, digitalization, learning analytics

 

The co-operation between an academic library and IT services in producing digital services

Minna Kivinen, M.A., Information Systems Specialist, Häme University of Applied Sciences, minna.kivinen(at)hamk.fi
Sinikka Luokkanen, M.A., Information Services Manager, Häme University of Applied Sciences, sinikka.luokkanen(at)hamk.fi

Diversification of studying styles and an increase in commercial higher education form an additional challenge for university libraries when providing services and materials. In the case of printed materials, it is easy for the library to serve all customer groups, but there are challenges in the field of digital services and the supply of electronic material. Libraries acquire licensed e-materials both via FinELib consortium and by themselves. Contracts are made for each individual organization and costs depend on the volume of users. Access to e-materials stem from network settings; users who have rights for using e-materials should be able to connect to materials on campus as well as off-campus. Mobile and digital services are designed to serve university’s own students and staff. Finnish university libraries are open to the public and library staff must be aware of which services can be offered to different customer groups. Library staff have ongoing dialogue with university’s IT services to maintain library services and to find solutions to overcome technical barriers.

Key words: academic libraries, licensing, user groups, digital services

 

Information managers in co-operation

Marjo Valjakka, MBA (eServices and Digital Archiving), Planner, Data Management, Data Protection Officer, Laurea University of Applied Sciences, marjo.valjakka(at)laurea.fi

Information management is a legislated obligation for the universities of applied sciences but also an essential part of digital processes, securing the operations and management of reputation. Still problems in information management can be found in all the universities of applied sciences.

IT department has traditionally taken care of technical requirements of data management whereas the content and quality of information has been the responsibility area of records management professionals. The digital world needs, however, more cooperation between these two units as well as between the whole personnel. Every employee has to understand their role in handling the data.

Due to the requirements of legislation and digitalization, it seems that the time is now right for the concrete development of information management internally but also between the universities of applied sciences. One example of cooperation are CSC’s five idea paths concerning digital record management methods and digital archiving.

Every development project requires resources. That is why it is essential that the administration is committed for the development procedures and that the employees can see their benefits for themselves. Collaborative working methods, strategy based operational models as well as consistent training are the means to achieve high-quality managed information management and genuinely digital service processes in all the universities of applied sciences.

Key words: information management, record management, co-operation between UASes

 

Possibilities of utilizing artificial intelligence in customer service operations of service organizations

Sebastian Fagerström, MBA, Head of Sales, SME, Finland, If Insurance, sebastian.fagerstrom(at)gmail.com
Keijo Varis, D.Sc. (Business Administration and Economics: Management and Leadership), Principal Lecturer, School of Leadership, Master School of Engineering and Business, Turku University of Applied Sciences, keijo.varis(at)turkuamk.fi

This article discusses the possibilities of utilizing artificial intelligence in customer service activities in the service sector, especially in the insurance sector. To sum up, by utilizing correctly, artificial intelligence enables the development of customer service functions, both in terms of cost efficiency and quality of services. From the point of view of both the customer and the service organization, the combination of artificial intelligence applications and services provided by people is best suited to a customer-oriented and cost-effective service organizations. Artificial intelligence applications can automate simple and routine customer service situations and tasks, leaving more time for customer service personnel to handle situations and tasks that require emotional intelligence and extensive understanding and profound knowledge. As a whole, the service speeds up and the quality improves. However, the exploitation of artificial intelligence in the service sector of customer service organizations requires the creation of a comprehensive artificial intelligence strategy and its coordination with the service organization’s competition strategy, customer service strategy and IT strategy.

Keywords: Artificial intelligence, customer service, artificial intelligence strategy, learning systems

 

PEPPI – Digital Service Environment for Higher Education Institution management

Virve Peltoniemi, MBA, ICT Manager, Tampere University of Applied Sciences, virve.peltoniemi(at)tuni.fi

Peppi-ecosystem has expanded into the most significant ERP Service for Higher Education Institution (HEI) management. Peppi provides role-specific desktops and e-services for students, teachers, planners, higher education services and administrators.

Peppi offers interfaces for integration and there are also many plugins made by universities or commercial operator. Universities can acquire these plugins from the owner (HEI) or commercial operator.

Vision for Higher Education and research in Finland 2030 also set the sights on the Digital Service Environment consisting of digital services by HEI’s themselves and also shared digital services. How Peppi supports all this digital transformation?

Firstly, Peppi development model was improved in 2018. Six thematic groups of HEI-specialists drive forward system and service development. Secondly, service for Cross-Institutional Studies development project has started. Thirdly also accessibility testing of Student Desktop in on the way in 2019. In addition to all that new digital Peppi-service for the Management of Further Education, Extension Studies and studies in the Open University of Applied Sciences (UAS) has been released. As well there are some interesting Learning Analytics and Recognition of Prior Learning services in progress.

Key words: ERP Service, Peppi-ecosystem, digital service environment

 

The digitalisation of higher education institutions increasingly relies on a fast and reliable network

Harri Kuusisto, Funet Development Manager, CSC – IT Center for Science, harri.kuusisto(at)csc.fi
Maria Virkkula, Communications Specialist, CSC – IT Center for Science, maria.virkkula(at)csc.fi
Matti Laipio, Development Manager, CSC – IT Center for Science, matti.laipio(at)csc.fi

Can you imagine life without the internet? The university and research network serves as a backbone of everyday lives of students.

Functioning network connections facilitate smooth web surfing for students in a fast and reliable campus network. In today’s world, the day-to-day work of higher education institutions would practically come to a grinding halt without functioning network. Throughout its history Funet, higher education institutions’ common network, has aimed at breaking boundaries and records. It opened the door to the global internet for Finland 30 years ago. Since then, the network has been updated regularly. In the planning of the current update of the network, the aim has been to find a solution for the all future needs of students and personnel of higher education institutions.

Key words: internet, Funet, data communications, success story

Data protection was enhanced by training

Matti Kuosmanen, Lic.Phil., Data Protection Officer, Savonia University of Applied Sciences, matti.kuosmanen(at)savonia.fi
Olavi Pesonen, M.A., B. Eng. (Information Technology), IT Manager, Karelia University of Applied Sciences, olavi.pesonen(at)karelia.fi
Kari Kataja, M.Sc. (Eng.), M.A., M.Sc. (Econ.), M.Ed., Information Systems Manager, Data Protection Officer, Häme University of Applied Sciences, kari.kataja(at)hamk.fi

In 2017-2018, the Public Administration Information Management Advisory Board (JUHTA) and the Public Administration Digital Security Steering Group (VAHTI) organized two joint data protection projects.

In connection with these projects, the Population Register Center organized a security and data protection management training (TAISTO18) in November 2018. The aim of the exercise was to develop organizations’ capabilities to manage security breaches. About 235 public administration organizations participated in the exercise, of which seven were universities of applied sciences and eight were universities.

The exercise was successful and participation was felt to be useful. It is necessary to continue training in crisis situations. This is what TAISTO19 will do next autumn.

Key words: privacy, data security, TAISTO18, GDPR

 

Facilitating challenges for the interpretation of the EU Data Protection Regulation: cooperation and codes of conduct

Maria Rehbinder, LL.M., Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/E), Senior Legal Counsel, Academic Legal Services, Aalto-yliopisto, Vice Chairman of LIBER Working Group on Legal Matters
Ulla Virranniemi, LL.M., M.A., Data Protection Officer, Lecturer, Oulu University of Applied Sciences, ulla.virranniemi(at)oamk.fi
Kari Kataja, M.Sc. (Eng.), M.A., M.Sc. (Econ.), M.Ed., Information Systems Manager, Data Protection Officer, Häme University of Applied Sciences, kari.kataja(at)hamk.fi

Codes of conduct makes easier to contribute to the proper application of GDPR, taking account of the specific features of Finnish universities. Data protection officers of Finnish universities co-operate to create codes of conduct for research and student administration. Common codes of conduct reduces the need for local interpretation.

Key words: data protection, GDPR, codes of conduct, Higher education

 

Bank of Ideas – Collaboration, Visibility and Agile Experiments

Antti Mäki, Director, CSC, antti.maki(at)csc.fi
Outi Tasala, Customer Solution Manager, CSC, outi.tasala(at)csc.fi
Jussi Auvinen, Data Administration Contact, CSC, jussi.auvinen(at)csc.fi
Karoliina Ahtiainen, Customer Solution Trainee, CSC, karoliina.ahtiainen(at)csc.fi

Ideapankki, ”Bank of Ideas”, is a service with the intention of collecting, sharing and progressing development ideas to further the digitalisation of higher education and research in Finland. The service was developed in cooperation between AAPA and FUCIO, networks for Finnish Universities’ and Universities of Applied Sciences’ Chief IT Officers, and CSC – IT Center for Science. Ideapankki brings forth and discloses development needs and ideas to everyone in order to enable discussion on these while aiming to find the right body to progress and do pre-studies on these development ideas. Ideapankki has been in a trial use for about a year at the time of the publication, and experiences gained from this have been encouraging. Over 50 ideas have been submitted to the Ideapankki, and the idea committee, selected CIO’s from the CIO networks together with CSC have proposed ideas to different tracks for furthering them. Any representative of higher education or research institutions can propose a new development idea for Ideapankki.

Key words: Ideapankki, digitalisation, development ideas, cooperation, agile experiments, idea modelling, CSC