4/2015

No 4 (2015) Abstracts

The results and impact of RDI

RDI activities need to be systematically redeveloped to comprehensively respond to the needs of the Finnish business community and workplace development. In contrast to other key players in the national innovation system, the RDI activities of the universities of applied sciences are mainly implemented according to legal requirements to encourage employment, regional development and regional economic structural reform, usually in consultation with end users. Close interaction is, therefore, naturally an essential part of the process. In a changing business environment, regional action alone is no longer enough; the skills and expertise that are created can be applied more broadly, exploited, refined and added to knowledge created by other specialists. The articles in this special issue aim to demonstrate this recoverability by explaining the results and data. Based on the principles of open science and research, the methods, collected data and reporting of the results used in the RDI activities of universities of applied sciences will be applied increasingly in the future.

This special issue looks at the results and impacts of the projects specially funded by the Ministry of Education and Culture (MEC). In 17 special projects, the participating universities of applied sciences aimed, for example, to improve the RDI skills of their staff and connect RDI activity to education, and to increase cooperation between universities, research institutes and the workplace. The internationalization of education and RDI activities are reported in the results of several projects. In their editorial, Eeva Kaunismaa and Maarit Palonen (MEC), challenge actors in the universities of applied sciences to carefully examine their ways of working and to take their place in the innovation system.

Together with industry and commerce, the universities of applied sciences have sought solutions to the challenges facing society today. This anticipatory approach is a great strength of many of the projects. They seek innovative solutions to sustainable development issues. The design and implementation of social and health care reform is particularly relevant to graduates of the universities of applied sciences, who will work in future service professions. Developing and reforming customer-oriented social and health care services requires a broad network of actors, in which the universities of applied sciences play and will continue to play a significant role. The articles also demonstrate the flexibility of the universities of applied sciences, their open-minded culture of experimentation and team spirit as they seek to develop the network of universities of applied sciences.

Special Issue Editors Anne Kärki (Satakunta University of Applied Sciences) and Eero Pekkarinen (Lappi University of Applied Sciences)

Peer-reviewed Articles

Trialog seminar enables pedagogical change

Ikali Karvinen, Principal Lecturer , Dr.Sc. (Nutr.), B.S.N. Diakonia University of Applied Sciences
Eva Laine, Senior Lecturer, R.N., Nursing Teacher, M.Ed., Diakonia University of Applied Sciences

The welfare services in the Nordic countries are under the great development, and are aim to be fully patient and client centered in the future. Changes in the social and health care systems are forcing the higher education institutions to adapt pedagogical models, which able the students to learn to listen to the clients. The socio-pedagogical orientation in the education reminds us of the meaning of the holistic encounter in the field. The holistic way of caring is key to prevention and self-care. In this article, we aim to describe Trialog-seminars as a pedagogical method and model. In this model, the Trialog seminars as neutral and democratic meetings are used in learning and teaching in the social and health care education. The development of the model is based on the international development project, in which Trialog-seminars are developed in two cycles during the last few years and later on the Process-model of using Trialog as an instrument for teaching, MUTIT, was introduced.

Honing student skills and experience through peer group mentoring

Pertti Sillanpää, Principal Lecturer, PhD, M.Ed., Oulu University of Applied Sciences

The working life sets challenges to the education because the work has become constant learning. Meta-knowledge is still more important, to learn the learning, reflective know-how and the division of the expertise. The students’ peer group mentoring is one means to develop the readiness of the learning in the work.

In the pilot that was carried out in the journalism education of Oulu University of Applied Sciences a peer group mentoring was tried during school year 2014‒15. Four students of the final stage guided 4‒5 person groups which have consisted of the students of the first year.

The central research material was inquiries that were made to the mentees and mentors. The additional materials were the group interview of mentors and the reflection discussion in the closed Facebook group that has been gone with the mentors. The material was analyzed with the phenomenography method.

A questionnaire survey was connected to the pilot. Most considerable the matters which are related to studying and to the working life were discussed according to the results. The discussions supported the development of the vocational identity.

The reflective learning took place at best, it was at its weakest a question of the transfer of the information. The Mentors learn especially skills which are related to the directing of the group. Mentees got information about studying and about working life and empowerment belief in the managing. The mentees considered the experiment succeeded. The mentors of passive groups experienced the feelings of the failure.

In the future have to take account of the difference between mentoring and tutoring. Also, mentees need training. The practical arrangements are reflected in the interaction in turn which affects learning.

Articles

Global responsibility and sustainable development in the RDI activities of universities of applied sciences

Sami Kivelä, Lecturer, Project Manager , M.Th., Diakonia University of Applied Sciences
Hanna Hovila, Senior Lecturer, M.A., Diakonia University of Applied Sciences

The GLORE project strengthened the functional capacity of four universities of applied sciences in their teaching, research and development activities with developing countries. New international service models and networks were created in professional staff exchanges to promote sustainable growth and participation.

The network was guided by global responsibility, human dignity, mutual trust and sustainable solutions. When individuals can develop their capabilities to meet shared goals, new value is created. This also enhances quality and effectiveness.

Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences and small and medium sized enterprises – Towards International Innovation Projects

Heidi Myyryläinen, Project Manager, M.Sc. (Econ.), Saimaa University of Applied Sciences
Helena Puhakka-Tarvainen, Project Manager, M.A., Karelia University of Applied Sciences

Horizonhub project has aimed to raise the capability of the universities of applied sciences and their local innovative and growth-orientated SME´s to apply and manage international innovation projects. The project has been conducted by Saimaa University of Applied Sciences, Jyväskylä University of Applied Sciences, Tampere University of Applied Sciences and Karelia University of Applied Sciences and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd.

The Horizonhub project was conducted through four work packages. Those workpackages were identifying and streghtening organizational and network readiness for hubs, modelling professional exchanges and piloting new exchanges, international project apply process experiences and sharing good practices and networking.

In the article the view on relevant issues of the project, the view on international project preparedness and suggestions to raise the capacity are being presented. Further, the professional exchange model and a hub-model is being presented.

Big Data Analytics, a research project in the complex digital era

Kaj-Mikael Björk, Head of Department, Dr. Econ, Dr.Tech, Arcada University of Applied Sciences, Department of Business Management and Analytics

To make sense of the enormous amount of data is a very important challenge in our society today. This short paper presents the activities in, as well as some results from, the project Big Data Analytics. The main focus of the project is set on dealing with both big data and the underlying analytics. The examples are found from different business contexts, such as retail, industrial and the financial sector.

Triple jump to regional and international collaboration

Anne Kärki, Principal Lecturer, Project Manager, Dr.Sc. (Nutr.) Satakunta University of Applied Sciences
Niko Kandelin, Principal Lecturer, Lic.Sc. (Tech.), Satakunta University of Applied Sciences
Anna Korpi-Kyyny, copywiter, Bachelor of Culture and Arts, Zeeland Family
Anttoni Lehto, project specialist, M.A., Turku University of Applied Sciences
Teppo Lundell, Senior Lecturer, M.Pol.Sc., Satakunta University of Applied Sciences

CoastAL, the Federation of South-West Finland Universities of Applied Sciences, has for two years enhanced the research, development and innovation activities of both Satakunta University of Applied Sciences (SAMK) and Turku University of Applied Sciences (TUAS) via the Kolmiloikalla vaihtovirtaa (“Triple Jump”) project. In the article, the three different parts of the project are described: the regional innovation exchange with a strong emphasis on student participation, the national staff exchange with the different industry partners and the international staff exchange. In addition, the article discusses the benefits and opportunities arising from those operational models for strengthening the connection between universities of applied sciences and the surrounding industry.

Pk-inno project isa fast track for SMEs

Juha-Matti Päivölä, Project Manager, M.Sc. (Tech.), Seinäjoki University of Applied Sciences
Seliina Päällysaho, Research Manager, PhD, M.Sc. (Econ.), Seinäjoki University of Applied Sciences

This project activates the co-operation between Finnish universities of applied sciences and SMEs. The project aims to create and put into practice a policy to provide a broad personnel exchange and fast-track development operations for companies. This model is based on short term actions, through which the companies will benefit from rapid co-operation.

Open House – the doors swing open

Marjaana Kivelä, Project Manager, M.P.A., Mikkeli University of Applied Sciences
Anne Määttä, Project Manager, M.Ed., Kajaani University of Applied Sciences
Fulvio Rizzo, RDI specialist, Dr.Soc.Sc., Mikkeli University of Applied Sciences
Anna-Maija Torniainen, project worker, B.B.A., Mikkeli University of Applied Sciences
Heta Vilén, Project Manager /business cooperation planner, Master of Business Administration, Kymenlaakso University of Applied Sciences

By the means of teachers’ placement periods, the Open House project has aimed at promoting the exchange of knowledge between universities of applied sciences and working life. Specific attention has focused on developing the professional skills of universities of applied sciences’ staff, on creating new networks, and on achieving a solid and durable cooperation between higher education and work organizations. The placement periods have been very fruitful and positive experiences from the teachers’ point of view. Their professional and cooperative skills have by all means improved, together with the opportunity to understand concretely a variety of entrepreneurial cultures. The Open House project has also aimed at integrating students in the working life. During the placement periods, successful results have included carrying out parts of the courses in real working environments, achieving many theses, performing internships, as well as involving universities of applied sciences from abroad. Last but not least, the foundations for future cooperation models have been laid out. From the companies’ point of view, the teachers’ placement periods are a good model of cooperation between universities of applied sciences and working life. At the same time, universities of applied sciences’ ability to address rapid changes in working life should increase. In addition to the placement periods, in the Open House project the exchange of knowledge has been tested in different ways. These include working life representatives’ lectures, new methods of implementation, as well as innovation camps. To summarize, in order to further strengthen the interaction between higher education and working life, it is key that placement periods are also implemented in the future. In this regard, the role of the mentors at universities of applied sciences should be particularly emphasized. Further, beyond a strong motivation between all the parties involved, emphasis should be given to the engagement process and/or informal interactions between the companies, the universities of applied sciences, and the teachers prior to the placement periods.

“Best practice” in social and health care services

Jyrki Kettunen, senior researcher, Dr.Sc. (Nutr.), Arcada University of Applied Sciences
Ira Jeglinsky-Kankainen, Principal Lecturer, Dr.Sc. (Nutr.), Arcada University of Applied Sciences
Anne Kärki, Principal Lecturer,  Dr.Sc. (Nutr.) Satakunta University of Applied Sciences
Camilla Wikström-Grotell, Vice Rector, Dr.Sc. (Nutr.)., Arcada University of Applied Sciences

A prerequisite for the development of effective social and health care services are competencies in professional higher education and working life, as well as cooperation with research institutes. The introduction of evidence-based methods requires systematic collection of effects, critical evaluation of research results and compiling knowledge to care recommendations. The overall objective of the Vata-project was to create new, permanent local networks and operating models to support the development and use of efficient services. This was done in collaboration between research organizations, universities and working life. The project has developed new recommendations for good praxis in both the public and private sectors as well as in the NGO. The developed model for collaboration can in the future be utilized when developing evidence-based services.

Collaboration boosts RDI activities for FUAS members

Susanna Vanhamäki, RDI Advisor, Project Manager, M.Soc.Sc., Lahti University of Applied Sciences
Antti Ahola, Project Manager, M.Pol.Sc., Laurea University of Applied Sciences
Kirsi Hyttinen, doctoral candidate, Research Manager, M.Ed., Laurea University of Applied Sciences
Seppo Niittymäki, Research Manager, Principal Lecturer, Lic.Sc. (Tech.), Häme University of Applied Sciences

The possibilities for RDI activities in the FUAS Federation’s universities of applied sciences have been enhanced with financial support given by the Ministry of Education and Culture. The FUAS Federation is a strategic alliance formed by Häme University of Applied Sciences, Lahti University of Applied Sciences and Laurea University of Applied Sciences. The universities of applied sciences in the federation are independent actors that do strategic cooperation. A common goal has been the preparation of project proposals and the acquisition of outside funding from different research and development programs. Due to this project, the collaboration between the universities of applied sciences and their working life partners has become more frequent. This has had an important role in the development of long-term partnerships and in the acceptance of project proposals.

Collaboration gets results in mining sector research

Juho Torvi, Project Manager, M.Sc. (Tech.), Kajaani University of Applied Sciences
Tuomas Pussila, Project Manager, M.Sc. (Tech.), Lappi University of Applied Sciences

Kajaani and Lapland Universities of Applied Sciences (KUAS and Lapland UAS) in collaboration have developed mining education and R&D activities. As a result of the work done in 2014–2015, new partners have been gained from 12 countries, and at the same time, co-operation with Finnish universities has deepened. Employee expertise has been developed by trainings and business exchange periods. The survey results show that 94 % of companies were willing to offer exchange opportunities also in the future. The development of clustered activities and expertise in KUAS and Lapland UAS have resulted total of 13 % share from the Finnish mining sector research volume. The next development step is the implementation of a virtual mining environment for education and research purposes.

Visualization in teaching power distribution technology

Juhani Rouvali, Principal Lecturer, Lic.Sc. (Tech.), Savonia University of Applied Sciences
Jarkko Lehtonen, Head of Degree Programme, M.Sc. (Tech.), Tampere University of Applied Sciences
Pasi Puttonen, Senior Lecturer, Lic.Sc. (Tech.), Jyväskylä University of Applied Sciences

The visualizing of technical environment is the challenge in learning and teaching of electric power distribution systems. The illustrative material, like photographs, gives realistic images of the system for students. This study presents applications and user experiences of system visualization using PowerPoint, network planning software, and digital platform ThingLink.

“Hands on” professional RDI training

Sirkka Saranki-Rantakokko, content coordinator, M.Sc. (H.C.), D.B.A., Lappi University of Applied Sciences
Pekka Lahti, Project Manager, M.Sc. (Econ.), Haaga-Helia University of Applied Sciences

This article discourses the development and structuration of the Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences, Research-, development and innovation (RDI) activities, through the R&D expert coaching -project. The development was based on societal needs. All 26 of Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences were part of the development. As a result, operation model for user- and practice driven RDI-knowhow was developed. The model was based on the feedback of the first pilot group, attending the coaching program as well as on the discourse of various expert groups of the RDI field. The collected data was analyzed by method of content analysis. The development work has been also evaluated from the perspectives of impact, results and effectiveness.

In the RDI model for user- and practice driven RDI-knowhow, the modules were produced by various accountable parties and were the key component of the content of the coaching program. The attendees of the coaching program were the owners and processors of their individual an organizational development of RDI knowhow. The support of spreading the new knowledge further within the attendee’s organization was done through the mentors of the attendees. The produced modules created two main themes: “Research and development” and “Innovation and commercialization.” To support and boost networking between the attendees of each of the two main themes of the coaching program, a common theme “Boot camps” was created. The coordination of the operation model was centralized to one University of Applied Sciences. In addition the coaching was even further bind to societal and current themes.

Seven new learning environments show how RDI impacts on professional master’s degrees

Katri Ojasalo, Director of Master´s Degree Programmes, Dr.Sc. (Econ.), Laurea University of Applied Sciences
Sari Miettinen, Principal Lecturer, Dr.Sc. (Nutr.), Häme University of Applied Sciences
Outi Törmänen, Principal Lecturer, Dr.Sc. (Nutr.), Lappi University of Applied Sciences
Pirjo Vaittinen, Master´s Degree Programme Development Manager, Dr.Sc. (Nutr.), Saimaa University of Applied Sciences
Johanna Hautamäki, Project Manager, M.A., Centria University of Applied Sciences
Varpu Lipponen, Principal Lecturer, Dr.Sc. (Nutr.), M.A., Tampere University of Applied Sciences
Tiina Seikkula, Principal Lecturer, Lic. Food Tech., Lahti University of Applied Sciences

All Finland’s universities of applied sciences participated in the project called “Creating a strong R&D profile for Master’s degree programmes” funded by the Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture in 2014–2015. The purpose of the comprehensive project was to profile and strengthen the role of RDI in UAS Master level education. This article describes outcomes of the work package 1 which aimed at developing learning environments that promote workplace reform and RDI activities. The article shows seven examples of new learning, meeting and development environments – one from each UAS that participated in the work package 1: research group (Häme UAS), cloud service (Lapland UAS), multiprofessional group (Saimaa UAS), simulation space (Centria UAS), co-design event (Laurea UAS), authentic learning environment (Tampere UAS) and multidisciplinary development environment (Lahti UAS).

Join the navy, see the world – professional master’s degrees flow into the world of work

Ari Lindeman, team leader, M.Sc. (Econ.), M.A., Kymenlaakso University of Applied Sciences
Soili Mäkimurto-Koivumaa, Principal Lecturer, PhD, Lappi University of Applied Sciences
Anne Pohjus, Vice Rector, Dr.Sc. (Tech.), Satakunta University of Applied Sciences
Tuija Toivola, RDI Manager, Dr.Sc. (Econ.), Haaga-Helia University of Applied Sciences

Our aim was to create new multi- and interdisciplinary RDI models that renew work practices. Nine universities of applied sciences participated in this development work. Multidisciplinary thesis based on working life needs, collaborative learning and development methods, new RDI operational models and the description of multi- and interdisciplinary development competence were the topics we especially focused on throughout the two year working period. This led to new knowledge and innovations for the companies and other organizations. In addition, it produced new ways to implement RDI activities as a part of master level teaching and learning.

Diversity and inclusin management supporting organizational development

Liisa Timonen, Head of International Affairs, Doctor of Education, Karelia University of Applied Sciences
Rauni Leinonen, Principal Lecturer, Doctor of Education, Kajaani University of Applied Sciences
Anne Mäntysaari, Head of Degree Programme, Master of Economic Sciences, Jyväskylä University of Applied Sciences
Erja Turunen, Development Manager, Licentiate in Economic Sciences, Metropolia University of Applied Sciences

In this article we discuss the results of the work package Diversity and Inclusion Management as a tool for the organisational development. The work package discussed here has been implemented by Karelia, Jyväskylä, Kajaani and Metropolia universities of applied sciences with a strong student and industry involvement. We have been developing agile RDI-practices, teaching and learning and built understanding about the concept of diversity and inclusion management in the UAS context. In this article we share the main results of our development work paying particularly attention into the impacts among the beneficiaries.

Professional master’s degree programme builds bridges on the tripartite model

Pia Ahonen, Head of Education and Research, Dr.Sc. (Nutr.), Turku University of Applied Sciences
Raija Nurminen, Principal Lecturer, Dr.Sc. (Nutr.), Turku University of Applied Sciences
Kaisa Sorsa, Principal Lecturer, Associate Professor, Dr.Sc. (Econ.), LL.D., Turku University of Applied Sciences
Kari Salonen, Principal Lecturer, Dr.Soc.Sc., M.A., Turku University of Applied Sciences

Regina Nurmi, Principal Lecturer, Lic.Ed., Vaasa University of Applied Sciences
Ulla Isosaari, Principal Lecturer, D.B.A., Vaasa University of Applied Sciences
Paula Hakala, Principal Lecturer, Dr.Sc. (Nutr.), Vaasa University of Applied Sciences

Pirkko Kouri, Principal Lecturer, Dr.Sc. (Nutr.), Savonia University of Applied Sciences
Hilkka Lassila, Principal Lecturer, Dr.Sc. (Econ.)., Savonia University of Applied Sciences
Sirkka-Liisa Halimaa, Principal Lecturer, Dr.Sc. (Nutr.), Savonia University of Applied Sciences
Arto Toppinen, Principal Lecturer, M.Sc. (Tech.), Savonia University of Applied Sciences

Kaisa Koivisto, Principal Lecturer, Dr.Sc. (Nutr.), Oulu University of Applied Sciences
Anja Henner, Principal Lecturer, Dr.Sc. (Nutr.), Oulu University of Applied Sciences
Liisa Kiviniemi, Principal Lecturer, Dr.Sc. (Nutr.), Oulu University of Applied Sciences
Pirkko Sandelin, Principal Lecturer, Dr.Sc. (Nutr.), Oulu University of Applied Sciences
Jaana Kuusipalo, Principal Lecturer, Dr.Sc. (Econ.), Oulu University of Applied Sciences
Tiina Gallen, Principal Lecturer, Dr.Sc. (Econ.), Oulu University of Applied Sciences
Kirsi Koivunen, Principal Lecturer, Dr.Sc. (Nutr.), Oulu University of Applied Sciences

Ellinor Silius-Ahonen, Principal Lecturer, PhD, Arcada University of Applied Sciences
Åsa Rosengren, Principal Lecturer, P.L., Arcada University of Applied Sciences

The tripartite model (cooperation of an UAS student, teacher tutor and a mentor from working life) promotes the birth of wide-ranging innovations. Innovative thinking, proactive management and ubiquitous learning are emphasized in the key competence profile of the UAS teacher. The success of RDI integration in the tripartite model lies on sustainable implementation of the model, on improving the integration of RDI activities and UAS studies, and on the reform of the key competence profile of the UAS teacher.

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